“Are you a mason?” A three part article Edited and Presented by Mike Lawrence Part Three

In this concluding section of the three part series we go from the Initiation to Installation of the Worshipful Master and matters in-between.

The Initiation

1

Receiving a wash whilst receiving the attention of the goat.

The Entered Apprentice

2

The Entered Apprentice smoothing the rough ashlar with the goat quizzically looking on.

The Passing

3

Passing the wine from one Brother to another with the goat nodding in anticipation?

The Raising

4

Having ‘Passed’ the wine it is now ‘Raised’ to be consumed.

The Installation

5

 

The Worshipful Master, gavel in hand addressing the Brethren.

Remarks from the Chair

6

The Worshipful Master makes an immediate impression but perhaps not in the manner intended.

The Worshipful Master

7

Well dined – showing the effect of the Master’s circuit?

The Last Degree?

7

Caption reads; ‘The Mason went home from the Meeting at three and his wife is now working the Last Degree’

8

Perhaps these were the duties being explained by the wife?

~~~~~

And so to the Signs, Grips, Password, Workings, the Test and the Charge!

The Sign

9

 

One can but smile.

The Grip

10

Caption reads; This is a ‘Grip’ he will always mind. He’s gripped before and he’s gripped behind’.

(Another) Grip

11

Caption reads; ‘I know your face Brother but you’ve forgotten the Grip’.

Hand writing reads; ‘Will ye no come back again’? referring to a non attending / lapsed Brother? Dated 21st July 1905

Combination of Grip and Sign

12

The Sign appears to be the glass of alcohol.

The Charge

13

Literally receiving the ‘Charge’ – goat attentive (and smiling?), Judge with the emblem of power, the gavel.

(Another version of) The Charge

14

The goat in hot pursuit ‘Charging’ the Brother!

The Test

15

Who is Testing who?

The Password

16

The theme of alcohol often appears.

Workings

17

Operative or Speculative?

Harmony

17a

The Worshipful Master leading his Lodge with the Closing Ode.

…and finally, from Labour to Refreshment

Message reads; ‘How will this one please?  That an awful loss of life at sea. Hoping you are all well at Dalmally. Best regards Jim

Sent 20th April 1912 and referring to the Titanic? which was lost on 15th April 1912.

To Absent Brethren.

It appears the ‘Are You A Mason’ postcards remained in print until the 1920’s with an estimated 150 known to exist today in their different forms.

<ends>

Footnote

I am seeking the following cards if any Brother can help complete my collection.

National Series 1600

  1. 1639 – Masons at work
  2. 1640 – The awful secret
  3. 1641 – title not known
  4. 1642 – The Banquet
  5. 1643 – The Password

National Series 2446

  1. 2446A – The Charge
  2. 2446E – The Test
  3. 2446F – The Passing

National Series 2600

  1. 2646 – Listening In

With regards to the 2600 Series there appears to be gaps in the numbering so it would be helpful if anyone can provide information on the full list. The apparent gaps are 2647 to 2660 inclusive and 2662 to 2675 inclusive. The numbers are on the backs of the postcards but any collector will know this.

Thanks for your help.

101@Freemasonsareus  102Freemasons Are Us

103freemasonsareus.wordpress.com  1_V7GYJQ_4lykfDzOf9q17eA@Freemasonsareus

 104freemasonsareus@gmail.com

 

2 Comments

Filed under Freemasonry, Masonic History, Masonic Ritual, Masonic Traditions

2 responses to ““Are you a mason?” A three part article Edited and Presented by Mike Lawrence Part Three

  1. Jon Torbert PM

    I don’t fully understand what these are. I’m thinking they are like postcards that were published in the early 1900’s. If that’s the case then I think I can understand why there was so much misinformation about masonry amongst the public and even conspiracy theories about the organization. I’m not sure why anyone will would want to collect them they should just be destroyed.

    • Hi Jon, yes they were humorous postcards published in the early 20th century in America and many Freemasons collect them as a Masonic curiosity. The jovial nature of the topics make them harmless and should be viewed as such. You will note, nothing or any consequenes is revealed. As for the suggestion they should be destroyed, they form part of our social history and had we previously destroyed the Masonic exposures of the 18th century, for the same reason, we would know little about the development of our ritual today, so they do have value to our society. Thank you for your interest and stay safe. Mike

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s